Meet Tuyet Duong!

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Tuyet Duong is a 2015 APAWLI fellow and also a Board member for the CAPAW. She and her partner are moving to Korea for the next three years.

What is your partner's assignment?

My partner is going to be an International Officer/Diplomat at the U.S. Embassy in Seoul.

What will you do?

I will be Director of Partnerships at DAWN, a global creative agency that is Asian and women owned! I will handle a variety of nonprofit, philanthropy, and political accounts. I’m thrilled and privileged to be able be an entrepreneur and have so much freedom to fly right now!

What city will you be in and how long? Who is all going?

We will live in an amazing flat/villa in Seoul for 3 years. All of us are going! (My partner, me, 3 boys, and my mother-in-law.)

What are you looking forward to the most about Korea?

I am looking forward to eating, connecting with incredible and diverse people from around the world, exploring my future and my career, showing my children the world and Asia, and having many many adventures.

Where can people reach you?

tuyet.g.duong@gmail.com

The Story of the Star Fish

In his book, The Star Thrower, author Loren E. Eisley talks of the early morning when he finds himself with “writers block”. On that morning, he decided to take a walk along a sandy beach where hundreds of starfish had been washed up on the shore overnight. He noticed a boy picking up the starfish one by one and throwing each back into the ocean.

Observing the boy for a few minutes Eisley asked him, “what are you doing?” The boy replied that he was returning the starfish to the sea; otherwise they would die when the burning rays of the sun hit them. He explained that it was worth the effort if only "to help this one.”

Eisley left the boy and went home to continue writing, only to find that he could not type a single word. He returned to the beach and spent the rest of the morning helping the boy throw starfish back into the sea.

It is from Eisley's story that The Center for Asian Pacific American Women draws its inspiration.

For while it may not be possible to “save the entire world”, one can do her part to take care of her corner of it.

"Sisters, Let Us Gather at the River" by Puanani Burgess

I was at an APAWLI gathering, and called to the women, I said, "Sisters let us gather at the river."

And they came as though it was a river. You know what I saw? I saw my Japanese grandmother at the river washing rice; I saw my Hawaiian tutu cleaning the dirt off the kalo; I saw thousands coming to the river.

It was a place of peace, a place of commerce, a place where you met each other, a place where you shared stories over washing laundry, washing babies, washing rice.

And the river was a mode of transporting us to the worlds beyond that place on the river we were a part of.

It became also a place of dreams and dreaming. Because by being at the river, we all knew that it flows to somewhere. That somewhere unnamed, the river always flows, like it or not. I think that's what drives us as women to go to the unnamed places, to travel that river -- to ride that raft of dream-hope.

The river must move and you can choose to become part of it or not. You can choose to stay on the bank, You can choose never to come close to it. But our choices can never deny that the river exists.

"In each of us, there is a river." When I said that at the women's gathering, you could tell for some unknowable and un-namable reason, those women felt the river flow through them, and they responded just as they would have one hundred fifty or two hundred years ago. They just came.

And there's something about going to the river. It's purposeful. We go to the river for a reason. And sometimes, the river will teach us things that we never thought we wanted to know.

And so APAWLI for me is a river.

It has a physical presence. And that's why we come to these gatherings. It's not just a gathering of human beings. It's a gathering of histories. It's a gathering of futures. It's a gathering of all time. We represent so many, many histories. I'm traveling on this river because it's what I want to do, where I want to be. I want to experience all those voices inside of us. Every time I come, every time I work on something with you, I hear a thousand voices that I never heard before. And they become part of the story, my own and yours.

So, let us gather at the river.